Tag Archives: preschooler

Trunki Sale til 8am PST Monday 31 at Haute Look

Well, I’ve been oogling the Trunki for several years now. One should realize as a parent that if something has a limited number of years of use, which most things do for children, other than bowls and cups (I still have my bunnikins bowl from childhood, and still eat out of it at 47!), one should buy it sooner rather than later, for the longest life per purchase.
(click image to go to trunki uk website)

But no, I bookmarked Trunki when my son was like 3, and looked at it in a store in town when he was four, and never bought it. Now at 5 1/4 he is nearly beyond the recommended years of use, but I decided to go for it, as there is now a super deal at Haute Look on it. This is a discount site for “haute couture” but also has deals on home decor, toys etc.

I’ve been dying to get a Trunki since my son has pretty much outgrown his stroller (I can still force him into them if he is sick and grumpy and I have to get someplace or walk for a long time) and we travel to visit my parents all the way across the country. It just seems like a great way for HIM to be responsible for his carry on and not me. Strollers are THE best for airline travel as you can take them gate to gate, loaded with all your coats, carry-on, purchases etc, and just dump them as you board the plane. And the airline has them ready for you to pile everything into as you deplane. But last year when he was 4.5 yrs old, it was really pushing it… my son didn’t sit in it one wee bit, I just pushed all our stuff. I understand bag ladies and their shopping carts. So loathe to give it up and carry everything for myself and my son.

Trunki movie!

But the Trunki has sit-on ride-em allure, as well as being easy for the child to pull. AND gives a place to sit and rest when tired, and can even be pulled by the parent with the child on it. They suggest 2-6 yrs old but I looked up reviews online and discovered that parents of 7 and even 9 yr olds were happy to have them. Perhaps the child’s legs are too long for riding but they loved to have their own pull-along suitcase, and a place to rest their butts in lines. So I went for it.

My friend got me to sign up to Haute Look and I discovered Trunki on sale for $27.99 instead of the $49.99 in shops here in town. We each got one and sent them both to the same address so we could share the $10.95 flat-rate shipping to Canada. So even with shipping, taxes and import, we are paying $38.50 apiece instead of $56.95 tax included we’d pay in town. And delivered to our door instead of slogging through snow and paying nearly $3 bus each direction. yay! So, since I think this is a GREAT deal and a GREAT product, I’m passing it on.

I guess I’m not the only one who thinks it is great, as when I discovered it online several years ago, the company was independent and now it is “Trunki by Melissa & Doug”… funny how these big companies keep getting bigger by snapping up the independents. I guess the owners played monopoly a lot as children!

The sale at Haute Look ends Monday 31 at 8am PST (so 11am here in Montreal), so you have to act quickly to get the Trunki there, but there will be new sales daily coming up if you are interested in signing up. My friend who invites me buys clothes for both her kids, as well as herself, on sale there. Great deals (though I am more a practical than fashion gal). Full disclosure: I get $10 credit if you sign up clicking my link and you buy something eventually (anything, at a later date)… though don’t shop for my sake!et

Advertisements

Maintaining bilingualism in adopted kids

Hi!
Long time no write. Just super very busy. Very super busy.

But I was pointed to this article Raising a Bilingual Child in Adoptive Families online magazine. Most of it is just reminders for me. But also reminders that my child has jumped from one group to another since August.

Big Boy is no longer at home all day with mommy except for a couple days of daycare. We used to do a lot of Chinese play together, hide and seek, Kingka game, watch Dora in Chinese etc. And now we just have a few hours in the evenings and weekends. So his Chinese exposure has really tapered off.

Also at now five years old, he has gone out of the toddler age where I can really just plop him in front of any dvd and he is thrilled. He actively uses the dvd player himself now and doesn’t have to rely on me to change the language to whichever he wishes to hear. He does bargain a bit: “… but will you let me watch another dvd if it is Chinese?”… “Yes!”… but I have to watch he doesn’t switch it to English when I’m not watching. Many of our materials have alternative English or Mandarin soundtracks (vs language learning dvds like Mei Mei, The River Dragon King, Walker and Ping Ping where the dvd is in English and the Chinese is words and phrases integrated into the English). I am happy to report that he does voluntarily chose Chinese language learning dvds out of our dvd library. And I keep adding new dvds to keep his interest fresh.

But I can no longer “force” him to listen to me read Chinese books out loud badly. And we have lost our weekly Chinese native speaker friend, whose current work schedule doesn’t allow for so much extra engagement.

Baby Learns Chinese Phonics bundle

On the other hand, he is coming of an age to be able to formally teach a language or go into language learning classes. I have bought the Baby Learns Chinese (sort of a misnomer for phonics program!) Phonics dvds for him for Christmas: I think he is ready now that he knows his ABC in English and French and has a good basic understanding of letter sounds from ReadingEggs.com Though I do have some concerns that the different sounds for letters in pinyin phonetics and English phonetics might confuse him (see previous post).

I am thinking that now he may be of an age to start Saturday Chinese Class… which is a Chinese community offering here. I believe the classes may be French/Chinese so would be more appropriate now that his French has improved exponentially with five day a week French preschool. He seems to be doing very well academically (vs behaviourally!) in the total francophone learning environment. So taking him to a Saturday Chinese Class for french speaking students might work now. Though I am not sure I want to add more school days to the life of a boy who has just just turned five. (or to lose my weekend relax time!) I’ll look into it.

But I do have to recognize that his interests and needs are evolving as he gets older and enters “school age” vs “preschool” (hah! I guess that is a funny thing to say about a kid who is officially a “preschool student”… an oxymoron when you think about it!)

So, for us, I read this article with a “trilingual” eye, as our bilingual needs are already taken care of. We are anglophone, living in a mostly English dominant continent, with anglophone extended family and friends. Living in a francophone environment, with preschool, daycare, friends and neighbors dominantly french.

How are you doing with a second or third language? How are you dealing with changing language needs as your child changes from baby to toddler, from toddler to preschooler, from preschooler to school age?

Some Montreal resources:

Montreal Chinese School: seems to be traditional characters, Sunday mornings or afternoons. Also seems to be geared towards kids whose first language is Mandarin.

JiaHua School of Montreal: They do have classes for children whose first language is not Mandarin, with the goal of integrating them into the regular Chinese classes with Mandarin speaking students, on Saturdays, starting at age 5.

McGill Playgroup for adopted Chinese Children I have friends who go to this who like it, though I think it is just a bit of a fun brush against their culture rather than real language learning.

One Book One Language?

I read a very interesting post over at Babelkid.blogspot about “reading” books in languages other than they are written in. You can also read my rather lengthy comment after the post.

Ourson Juliette book

L'ourson qui voulait une Juliette

I had read on another multilingual parenting site, that one way to get around a dearth of foreign (or heritage) language reading material is to translate easy to find books (mostly English) on the fly into the language you wish to be exposing your child too. Now my Chinese, which is the language we have the hardest time finding affordable books in, is not exactly fluent, so most English books would be beyond me. But I do sometimes try to turn very simple English books (ie board books with a couple words or a sentence per page) into Chinese books just to squeeze in more exposure. French books we have no problem with, since living in Quebec, French is the majority language. In bookstores they are still costly since they print in such smaller quantities than English books, but in the library they are definitely in the majority, and it is English books that are lacking in choice.

Seven Chinese Sisters book

The Seven Chinese Sisters

Anyways, I considered this idea and thought it brilliant as a way to get around the problem of being inundated with English books when you are fully fluent in another language.

I never once thought about the issue of language recognition, ie the child needing to learn that there is a correspondence between the spoken word and the printed word. Babelkid realized though, that her daughter didn’t recognize simple oft-repeated words in print in English… because she always “read” the books in French, thus there was no correspondence at all between the written and spoken text!

The Pet Dragon book

The Pet Dragon

I find this fascinating, and thinking about it, I see that it has helped Big Boy’s literacy that I am NOT fluent enough to do this quick trick! For a year now (he is four) he has been able to point to Chinese text and English text and name the correct language. He is able to point to words starting with the “T” sound like his name or “L” sound like mine. And through books like The Pet Dragon, as well as flashcards and games like Kingka, he can read quite a few Chinese characters like “xiao” “shan” “hua” “da” “ren” “kou” “chi”. Thank god that I didn’t read “petit” “montagne” “parler” “grand” “personne” “bouche” and “manger” when I pointed to those as I read along in a book! He’d think they were French characters!

Kingka game

Kingka game

I am sure that Babelkid’s daughter will sort things out, especially now that they have become conscious of the spoken/print disconnect. And I do certainly “explain” plots, words, concepts in one language that he doesn’t understand when I read it written on the page, in another language. But now I am certain to point to the printed word as I read exactly what is written there, and not point to the text when I am explaining in another language.

Amazing how one doesn’t consider these things when one is unilingual, or when one has learned other languages as a literate adult, not as a preliterate child one hopes to teach to read!

Xiao Gou Zai Nar book

Xiao gou zai nar?

Liang zhi Laohu: Two Tigers song

One great way to learn Chinese, or any language, is through songs. Usually they rhyme, are short and catchy, repeat limited language, and are pleasant to sing over and over. Many unilingual anglophones can sing Frere Jacques in French.

In Chinese, one of the first I learned was the Little Friends song, Zhao Pengyou. Apparently little kids in China sing this on their first day in preschool or kindergarten… they sing “look for a friend, find a friend, salute them, shake hands, you are my good friend” together with cute hand movements.

I learned this on Chinesepod.com and was delighted when I got to China, and Big Boy, who was 22 months old, obviously knew it. When I would sing, he would put his hand over his eyes as if he were searching and bob up and down, and stick his hand out for shaking on “wo wo shou” (shake hands). So not only is learning songs fun and educational, it is a good cultural bridge as well. I am reminded of my delight at 11 years old, when I went to Sweden with my dad and grandmother, to learn that my Swedish cousins knew “Eensy Weensy Spider” in Swedish!

Lately, Big Boy’s favorite Chinese kids’ song is Liang zhi Laohu (Two Tigers).

It goes like this:

Liang zhi lao hu
Liang zhi lao hu
Pao de kuai
Pao de kuai
Yi zhi mei you wei ba
Yi zhe mei you er duo
Zhen qi guai!
Zhen qi guai!

Sung to the tune of “Frere Jacques” (Are you sleeping, Brother John)

In English:

Two tigers
Two tigers
Run fast
Run fast
One has no tail
One has no ears
How very strange!
How very strange!

Here he is singing it, despite his self-proclaimed aversion to Chinese:

The funny thing is now when he sings it, I say “I don’t like Chinese! Don’t sing that in Chinese! I only like English! No Chinese!” as he tends to do when I want to read something in Chinese. And he gets all stubborn and asks my “Why? Why no Chinese? I like Chinese! I knowing Chinese!” and then sings Liang zhi laohu again! 😀 Nothing like a little reverse psychology!

Here it is at Chinesepod.com: Two Tigers song. It is also included on Mei Mei Hu’s “Speak and Sing Chinese with Mei Mei” cd, or with more explanation on the accompanying dvd “Play and Learn Chinese with Mei Mei”, which Big Boy loves.

I always thought that this song is so fun for kids, and could be taught to a classroom with puppets for instance, and then tonight I found that someone has indeed just recently turned it into a Chinese-teaching guide. Sam Song, who has written other Chinese as a foreign language teaching materials has put out Learn Chinese Through Song! The Popular Chinese Nursery Rhyme TWO TIGERS”

Two Tigers: Sam Song book

Two Tigers: Sam Song book

It’s very interesting, in that he teaches first word by word, in pinyin (how I wrote the lyrics above) and characters, then phrase by phrase (ie mei you means “doesn’t have” and wei ba means “tail”) and then sentence by sentence, so one has a complete comprehension of the whole text.

He also describes clearly tones and shows stroke order for writing characters. And finally has flash cards for all the words! You can see images online at the US Amazon site: Two Tigers

It really looks like a wonderful teaching too. He apparently has audio online as well, that links up with the book, word by word, phrase by phrase and sentence by sentence. It is an affordable $12.42 cdn or $11.49 US.

So, do you have any favorite foreign language songs that you found instrumental in your early learning journey? How about Chinese nursery rhymes to recommend?

Golden Valley splash suit update

Well, on Saturday it was drippy wet outside in the snow. Excellent for making snowmen and digging around in puddles of muck, so we put on the new blue Golden Valley splash suit (see previous post). Here it is on Big Boy:

Golden Valley splashsuit front

Golden Valley splash suit front view

Golden Valley splashsuit back

Golden Valley splash suit rear view

Golden Valley splashsuit side

Golden Valley splash suit side view

Golden Valley splashsuit bending over

Golden Valley splash suit bending over

Golden Valley splashsuit front with zipper

Zipper visible down front of splash suit

It is a size 6 (the size 5 was very small… the same size as his 4T MEC Newt Suit). Big Boy is about 105 cm tall, and this has the bottom hem rolled under about 4 inches (there is a nice mix of metric and imperial for you!), and you can see it fits over his LL Bean Kahtadin 4T snowsuit quite nicely, and still lots of room to bend and grow.

Unfortunately, like all inexpensive waterproof rain/splash suits, it keeps in the sweat. Here are a couple photos of the condensation both on the outside of the snowsuit (red) and the inside of the splash suit hood (blue). But I would rather hang up a snowsuit to dry a bit inside, than have him crying wet and cold outside when ice water and filthy mud and slush soak into his winter clothes. If he is sweating like that, it is because he is warm warm warm!

Snowsuit condensation

Condensation on snowsuit worn under splash suit

Splash suit condensation

Condensation inside splash suit hood

Sorry, it was dark outside (yes it is still getting dark before 5pm here), so no photos of it in action in the snow yet!

Welcome to Big Boy and Xiao Chien!

Hello! I have FINALLY gotten around to starting a blog about raising my son French and Mandarin Chinese as well as English. And throwing in product reviews, doggy thoughts, musings and rants as well.

I am a 40something single mom living in Quebec, Canada. I am self-employed in the arts, work from home, and have always wanted to be a mother. I adopted my son, who is now four years old, two years ago just before his second birthday. He was adopted through the SN (Special Needs) program in China, whereby children with minor correctible medical needs are given forever homes.

I am anglophone, and living in a francophone community, but I wish to maintain my son’s Chinese heritage, and part of that is giving him access to the language. I began learning mandarin during the long pre-adoption wait, and my interest only increased when I met him and learned he could indeed understand and respond to my very bad and limited chinese.

At this point, he speaks English as his first language, goes to daycare (garderie) 2-3 days a week in French as well as it being the dominant language in our neighborhood, and we try to do some Chinese learning daily. It is an uphill battle, now that he has been home from China for so long, and says “No Chinese, mommy! No talk French! Talk English!” but it is a battle I am willing to wage in all sorts of wiley ways.

This blog will be a place to address the issues of bilingualism or trilingualism, language learning, as well as just regular parenting and kid stuff. Throw in our Saint Bernard, and hopefully we’ll have more than enough to talk about.

Please feel free to subscribe, and especially to leave comments and suggestions. We’d love to hear from you.

And yes, Big Boy is my son, who is adamant that is what he is now.

And Xiao Chien is our Saint… a tongue in cheek mix of mandarin (xiao=small) and french (chien=dog)… in mandarin they often say “xiao gou” (shee-ow go) for dog… which is a big ironic considering our dog is about 115 lbs! (so : shee-ow shee-en)

Welcome to Big Boy and Xiao Chien!

Zai jian! Au revoir! See you again soon!